Unity Adventure Framework – The rise and fall of the door system.

Hi there!

My name is Rodo, coder at Point Bleep Studios and this segment is called Rodo Fridays.

Instead of writing nonsensical and unfunny satirical articles about being a jerk at work like my partner Poffle, here I will try to give a more detailed view about our current custom engine called Unity Adventure Framework.

It is essentially a set of tools that are meant to greatly increase development speed of point and click adventure games.

I guess I should start highlighting the strengths and unique features of the framework, but I won’t. Instead, I’ll quickly summarize what the framework cannot do (and probably won’t ever do) either because we don’t need it yet, I’m too lazy to implement or the implications of the feature’s development means too much work and too little impact on the finished product.


3D scenes.

Everyone knows 3D adventure games are children of the devil itself and should be burned with fire and sent back to the deepest levels of hell where they should remain strapped in chains and heavily guarded by the devil’s servants of hell.

On a serious note, I started making the engine “dimension agnostic”, especially for pathfinding its probably only needed to shift axis. I lost interest in supporting 3D for some reason I cant remember along the way.

Why not: I guess we just don’t quite like 3D adventure games.

gabrielknight3_7

Ok, some good 3D games might exist.


Sprite Scaling and Distance walk speed by defined zones.

This one is pretty shameful to admit, but we don’t currently handle sprite scaling when an actor is required to walk to a distance place. In AGS for example, you can define ‘zones’ on which the actor will be scaled down and will walk slower. Especially useful for long travels across the “Z”axis.

Why not: We don’t need it yet, our game worlds are cute little rooms tied together so we haven’t thought of it until now, meaning me writing this thing.

1709_3

Lovely zones management.


Room scrolling / edge scrolling.

You know, those super mega huge rooms which seems to never end, like the scenes in Thimbleweed Park everybody hates seems to love for some reason.

This might be a thing in the future, if certain artist win me in an ego competition.

Why not: We don’t need it yet, our game worlds are cute little rooms tied together.

Plus we like fast and smooth navigation. Who want to waste time waiting for an animated character to reach a completely unnecessary distant point?

2017-08-25 18_53_07-LD35 - Hallway.png - Paint

They are probably too small.


Doors Traversal.

Consider these two approaches to make an actor use a door.

The What Poffle wants but is never, ever, ever gonna happen, stop being a baby about it!’ approach:

  • Walk actor to a door. To the front at least, because the walkable area will prevent walking into another spot.
  • Open the door (animate it)
  • Change the walkable area grid (pathfinding) to include this new bit of walkable zone (the spot “behind” the door)
  • Re execute the pathfinding algorithm, calculate the new walkable areas.
  • Prevent the area to be walked by regular walking, but allow the actors to use it only if the event is a “Traverse door event”
  • Change the Z order of the actor
  • Close the door.
  • Fade Out
  • Change Room, place actor in destination door.
  • Fade In.
  • Open Door,
  • Change the walkable area grid (pathfinding) to include this new bit of walkable zone (the spot “behind” the door).
  • Re execute the pathfinding algorithm, calculate the new walkable areas.
  • Prevent the area to be walked by regular walking, but allow the actors to use it only if the event is a “Traverse door event”.
  • Walk actor to a ‘front_door’spot.

The ‘I’m not lazy, it’s an economy of effort’ approach:

  • Walk actor to the front of the door
  • Fade Out
  • Change Room, place actor in front of destination door.
  • Fade In.

Why my approach is better: Evidence speaks from itself, case closed your honor.

Vic Raider - Animated Prop - Closet_Locker@4x.gif

The world will miss these awesome doors.


Well, that’s all for now, dear imaginary readers, see you next Friday when I will write about something useful (no promises).

One thought on “Unity Adventure Framework – The rise and fall of the door system.

  1. Pingback: [Development Blog #3] The Mind of Marlo – Steam Release | Point Bleep Studios

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